ONLINE WEBINARS, TRAININGS &

NETWORK-WIDE ORGANIZING CALLS

As we face the double crises of COVID-19 and climate disruption, and with much of the world in lockdown, there is a crack, an opening, in the system where we have the possibility to shape a new world, and dismantle the detrimental, institutionalized systems of patriarchy, colonization, racism, and predator capitalism that lie at the root of our perilous predicament. 

To build a foundation for deep systemic change, which is necessary at this moment to care for our communities and the Earth, it is vital to uplift and amplify women's unique leadership, Indigenous cultural and ecological knowledge, as well as the deep political analysis of all historically marginalized frontline communities and justice movements, while we continue to challenge corporate power.

The same ideologies and behaviors that led to COVID-19, climate chaos, and environmental degradation display a human relationship with Nature that is devastatingly out of balance. To address this profound moment in time, the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network has launched,  “A Just and Healthy World is Possible: WECAN Advocacy and Solutions Series,” an ongoing webinar program lifting up women's leadership to support next steps as we continue to collectively build a powerful movement founded on principles of justice, love, and a fierce dedication to our planet and each other

 

We held our first webinar in the series on March 25, "Caring for Our Communities: COVID-19 and our Health, Connections to Climate Preparedness, and Systemic Change", where frontline women practictioners and advocates shared best practices for caring for ourselves and communities, while providing political and cultural analysis. Speakers included Rupa Marya, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine at UCSF; Linda Black Elk (Catawba Nation), Director of Food Sovereignty Programs at United Tribes Technical College; Jacqui Patterson, Director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program; and Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director of WECAN International. A recording of the first webinar in the series is available on YouTube or on our Facebook page.

To live in a healthy and just world, we must fundamentally change how we respect and interact with the Earth and each other. During the series, we will offer opportunities to participate in immediate solutions and actions, deepen political analysis, learn from and uplift frontline women's leadership, gain understanding of Traditional Ecological Knowledge, exchange movement information, and address the climate crisis through a feminist lens. Topics will include forest and biodiversity protection, Indigenous rights, self-care and healing practices, agro-ecology and home-permaculture, fossil fuel resistance, divestment and a just transition, feminist economics, protection of women land defenders, rights of nature, decentralized/democratized energy grids, deepening our connection to nature, and more.

We are at a turning point, and it is now more than ever that we must strengthen our commitment to the vision and world we seek — together. While we can’t physically be together, there is a lot we can do by connecting digitally to ensure the acceleration of a global feminist movement for the protection and defense of the Earth’s diverse ecosystems and communities — all are welcome, please join us!  In case you miss live webinars, all are recorded and links to view are below.

Check back for more online events, coming soon!

Please find more recordings, descriptions, and speaker details for 

WECAN's recent Advocacy & Solutions webinars down below! 

Please direct any and all questions to: katherine@wecaninternational.org

For updates and reminders about webinars, trainings, network calls, and other WECAN International events and activities, please join our network!

Ratifying the Escazú Agreement:

Women for Human Rights and the Defense of Nature

During the 2020 UN General Assembly and Climate Week NYC, The Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International and Reacción Climática organized an online education and advocacy forum, to discuss the importance of the Escazú Agreement, and how everyone—the international community and global movements— can advocate for the ratification and full implementation of this vital piece of legislation that can protect diverse ecosystems ad  defenders of the land, and is essential to our global climate and environment.


During this online forum women policy makers, Indigenous leaders, and human rights defenders highlighted the challenges women face in securing human and Indigenous rights, participating in climate policy, and shared the importance for the ratification of the Escazú Agreement. Our goal is to engage regional stakeholders, with the backing of civil society, in the Escazú Agreement with the aim of securing one more country to ratify the agreement in order for it to enter into force next year (2021). 

A recording of this webinar is available via the buttons below. 

We also discussed how the Escazú Agreement can be a powerful tool for Women Environmental and Human Rights Defenders (WEHRD) to protect their human rights and to be able to analyze legal frameworks that allow WEHRD to carry on with their work with the awareness that Escazú Agreement  can help them accomplish their work in a safe and more effective manner.

Speakers included: Patricia Gualinga, Kichwa leader from Sarayaku, Spokeswoman for Mujeres Amazónicas Defensoras de la Selva (Ecuador); María Luisa Rafael, Quechua leader, Human Rights and Environmental activist (Bolivia); Taily Terena, Terena Nation, Indigenous rights activist (Brazil); Andrea Sanhueza, public representative for the Escazú agreement (Chile); Ruth Spencer, Deputy Chair of the Marine Ecosystems Protected Areas (MEPA) Trust (Antigua and Barbuda); H.E. Ms. Patricia Madrigal Cordero, Ex-Vice-minister of Environment (Republic of Costa Rica); Ana Llácer, Journalist, Filmmaker & Environmental Activist (Spain & USA); Carmen Capriles, Founder of Reacción Climática, WECAN Coordinator for Latin America (Bolivia); Paloma Costa, youth climate leader (Brazil); with facilitation and comments by Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director of WECAN International (USA). Full speaker bios available here.

The women speakers represent the leaders on the frontlines, international policymakers, and Escazu advocates who are also the inspiration for alternatives and solutions for a healthy and just world at this critical time of multiple expanding crises. Learn more about the Escazú Agreement here!

Indigenous Rights and Women's Leadership

are Central to Divestment Strategies

In light of the intensifying climate crisis and Covid-19 pandemic, it has never been more clear the importance of Indigenous rights and self-determination, and women’s leadership as central strategies for justice and protection of Mother Earth. From the frontlines of extraction to the boardrooms of financial institutions to the halls of governments, Indigenous women are leading resistance efforts against the fossil fuel industry.

 

Indigenous women and their allies are building critical strategies for national and international divestment that call for justice and accountability from the financial sector, while advocating for a Just Transition that places people and planet first. Much more is needed, however divestment advocacy, direct actions, and campaigning are having a critical impact on the fossil fuel industry regarding moving funds out from the dirty energy sector and generating policy changes to uphold Indigenous and human rights as we face the climate crisis.

A recording of this webinar is available via the buttons below. 

Speakers include: Casey Camp Horinek, Ponca Nation, long-time Native rights activist, Environmental Ambassador and WECAN Board Member; Charlene Aleck, Tsleil-Waututh Nation, former Councillor with the Tsleil-Waututh Nation and Trans Mountain pipeline expansion opponent; Monique Verdin, Houma Nation, Director of The Land Memory Bank & Seed Exchange, Organizer with Another Gulf is Possible; Michelle Cook, Diné, Founder of Divest Invest Protect, Founder and Co-Director of the Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegations; with facilitation and comments by Osprey Orielle Lake, Founder and Executive Director of the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN), Co-Director of the Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegations. Full speaker bios available here.

Women for Forests and Future Generations:

Defending Communities from Pandemics and Climate Chaos

Global forests are on the brink of ecological catastrophe, and because of this, further driving the climate crisis and environmental degradation. Record setting fire seasons, deforestation, and industrial-scale logging, mining and extraction are destroying irreplaceable ecosystems. In the face of violence against land defenders, the coronavirus, and forest destruction, diverse groups of women are rising.

From the tropical to temperate rainforests, Indigenous women in particular are organizing to restore damaged forest ecosystems, protect vital old-growth forests, share traditional knowledge and stories, and uphold Indigenous rights while exposing the intertwined root causes of forest destruction: extractive economies, corporate greed, endless consumption, Indigenous rights violations, colonization, and gender injustice. 

A recording of this webinar is available via the buttons below. 

Speakers include: Daiara Tukano, Tukano Indigenous people - Yé'pá Mahsã, clan Eremiri Hãusiro Parameri of the Alto Rio Negro in the Brazilian Amazon, independent communicator and coordinator of Radio Yande; Helena Gualinga, Kichwa, youth social and climate activist, from Sarayaku, Ecuador; Wanda Culp, Tlingit, artist, and WECAN Tongass Coordinator, Alaska, USA, joined by the WECAN Indigenous Women Tongass Representatives; Neema Namadamu, SAFECO and WECAN Democratic Republic of Congo Coordinator, DR Congo; Dr. Juana Vera Delgado, Gender Expert and Women2030 Program Assistant, Global Forest Coalition; and Facilitation and comments by Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director, WECAN International. Read the full speaker bios here

 

During the 'Women For Forests' education and advocacy webinar, we will explore various topics including: crucial resistance efforts by Indigenous women in Brazil and Ecuador to protect the Amazon and their communities in the face of COVID-19 and attacks against women land defenders; inspiring examples of women planting trees and regenerating damaged lands in the Democratic Republic of Congo, after assaults by local militias; efforts to protect the Tongass rainforest in Alaska from Trump administration destructive environmental policies; updates on international forest policies; and other stories and lessons from women's work to stand for global forests, their communities, and the web of life.

Structuring an Economy for People and the Planet

in the Time of Climate Crisis & COVID-19

May 28 - Structuring an Economy for People and Planet in the Time of Climate Crisis & COVID-19

During the webinar, women and feminists from different regions of the world will unite to discuss alternative economies that counteract extractive economic systems, colonization, racism, and patriarchy— and instead uplift women’s labor, center Indigenous knowledge, and prioritize people and planet. There could not be a more important time to ensure we do not go back to business as usual.

The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare the severe cracks in our global economic system. Rooted in neo-liberal capitalism, the current economic system is set to continue to rapaciously extract resources from the Earth and drive the dual crises of climate chaos and pandemics, while exploiting the labor of people worldwide to line the pockets of wealthy CEOs, fossil fuel companies and other large corporations.

A recording of this webinar is available via the buttons below. 

As we see disaster capitalism play out in real time, we must disrupt the system and call for a regenerative, rights-based economy that prioritizes communities and nature.  What is needed now is an investment in alternative economic models predicated on community-led solutions, Indigenous knowledge, and ancient concepts of reciprocity with the Earth and all living beings. Already there are Indigenous economies to learn from and an emergence of socially just, place-based, caring economic models that are structuring a path forward.

Speakers include: Melina Laboucan-Massimo (Lubicon Cree First Nation), Campaign Director, Indigenous Climate Action; Ruth Nyambura, Kenyan Activist with African Ecofeminist Collective; Dr. Julia Kim, Program Director, Gross National Happiness (GNH) Centre Bhutan; Cindy Wiesner, Executive Director, Grassroots Global Justice Alliance; Ellen Brown, Attorney and Founder of the Public Banking Institute; Rauna Kuokkanen (Sápmi) Research Professor of Arctic Indigenous Studies at the University of Lapland, Finland; Comments and moderation by Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director Women's Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN). Full bios are available here.

Indigenous Women of Brazil and Ecuador on the Frontlines:

COVID-19 and Defending Communities and the Amazon

April 16 - Indigenous Women of Brazil and Ecuador on the Frontlines: COVID-19 and Defending Communities and the Amazon

During this webinar, Indigenous women leaders of the Ecuadorian and Brazilian Amazon will unite to discuss how the devastating coronavirus pandemic is impacting their communities, as they face ongoing deforestation, oil extraction, and Indigenous rights violations in their territories. As is the case across Turtle Island, Indigenous peoples of the Global South are at higher risk of contracting COVID-19 due to a lack of resources and health disparities brought on by centuries of colonial policies and environmental racism. Indigenous women leaders will share their stories, analysis, wisdom, and advocacy for Indigenous rights, protection of forests, water, communities, and the global climate. They will also address the ongoing political and economic struggles affecting their Amazonian territories.

Speakers include Patricia Gualinga, Kichwa leader from Sarayaku, Ecuador, Spokeswoman for Mujeres Amazónicas Defensoras de la Selva (Amazon Women in Defense of the Jungle); Sônia Bone Guajajara, Indigenous leader from Brazil, Executive Coordinator for the Articulation of Indigenous Peoples of Brazil (APIB) with translation by Maria Paula, Founder of the NGO “A Drop in the Ocean; Daiara Tukano, Indigenous activist from Brazil, independent communicator and coordinator of Radio Yandê; and Helena Gualinga, Kichwa youth activist from Sarayaku, Ecuador. Moderation and comments by Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director of the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN). Full bios can be found here.

A recording of this webinar is available via the buttons below. 

Indigenous Women of North America, Turtle Island

on the Frontlines: COVID-19 and Fossil Fuel Resistance

April 14 - Indigenous Women of North America,  Turtle Island on the Frontlines: COVID-19 and Fossil Fuel Resistance

During the webinar, Indigenous women leaders will discuss how COVID-19 is impacting their communities and how oil and gas pipelines are being fast-tracked in their lands— violating Indigenous rights and further putting Indigenous women at risk. In this wide-ranging discussion, presenters will share calls to action, stories and wisdom, immediate needs of their communities, community-care practices, and the latest updates from various campaigns and resistance movements, focusing on Keystone XL, Line 3 and Coastal GasLink pipelines, and tar sands extraction. Share this event with your networks via Facebook here.

Speakers include Freda Huson (Chief Howihkat), Unist’ot’en – Wet’suwet’en People, Leader and spokesperson for the Unist’ot’en camps resisting the Coastal GasLink Pipeline; Faith Spotted Eagle (Tunkan Inajin Win), Dakota and Nakota Nations within the Oceti Sakowinan, Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines Resistance Leader; Tara Houska, Couchiching First Nation Anishinaabe, Tribal Attorney and Founder of Giniw Collective, Line 3 pipeline Resistance Leader; and Eriel Tchekwie Deranger, Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation, Executive Director of Indigenous Climate Action, Tar Sands extraction Resistance Leader. Moderation and comments by Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director of the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN). Full bios can be found here.

A recording of this webinar is available via the buttons below. 

Caring For Our Communities:

Covid -19, Our Health, Climate, and Systemic Change

March 25 - Caring for Our Communities: COVID-19 and our Health, Connections to Climate Preparedness, and Systemic Change​​​

During the webinar frontline women practitioners and advocates will share best practices for caring for ourselves and communities, and provide political and cultural analysis. Presenters will discuss vulnerabilities in our diverse communities, and how we can work to support each other. Speakers included Rupa Marya, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine at UCSF; Linda Black Elk (Catawba Nation), Director of Food Sovereignty Programs at United Tribes Technical College; and Jacqui Patterson, Director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program in conversation with Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director of WECAN International. 

  • Watch a recording of the webinar here.​

  • A list of links and resources provided during the call is available here.

Global women leaders strategize together - Photo via Lori Waselchuk

Resources & Blogs From Past Online Trainings

The Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International is a solutions-based, multi-faceted organization established to engage women worldwide in policy advocacy, on-the-ground projects, direct action, trainings, and movement building for global climate justice.

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